Deming’s 14 Points

Systems Thinking and the Vanguard Method

W. Edwards Deming’s 14 points are the basis for transformation of industry. Adoption and action on the 14 points are a signal that the management intend to stay in business. aim to protect investors and jobs. Such a system formed the basis for lessons for top management in Japan in 1950 and in subsequent years.

The 14 points apply anywhere, to small organisations as well as to large ones, to the service industry as well as to manufacturing. They equally apply to any division within a company and to it’s suppliers.

As you read through each of the 14 points below, ask yourself if they still apply today, either within your current organisation, or within organisations you have recently worked for. The answers may be surprising.

1. Constancy of purpose:

Create constancy of purpose toward continual improvement of product and service, with a plan to become competitive and to stay…

View original post 2,657 more words

Deming’s 14 Points

Frustration with Procrastination

Days eChain

Procrastination is a slippery adversary, stealthy, incidious, secretive maybe even seductive enemy that creeps up behind you, moves in and remains, unwelcome but tolerated.

WHO HAS TROUBLE WITH PROCRASTINATING? You know – putting things that need to be done – off. Avoiding the annoyance or unpleasantness involved with that thing that needs doing. No? Not you? Not ever? WOW. Impressive. It’s not that I doubt you but … let me ask you a few more questions, OK?

How is that Tax record organising going? Been to the Tax Agent this year? Maybe it is not Tax for you, maybe it is going to the Dentist? Cleaning the Bathroom? Gutters? No? Weight loss err weight management? Well – most of us put things off from time to time. We put them in the too hard basket, because we either have a thought, a feeling or a behavior – happening, that is…

View original post 690 more words

Frustration with Procrastination

System Dynamics in Project Management

Project Management Lifecycle
Project Management Lifecycle (Photo credit:

The following is taken out of the summary of an old PhD thesis from 1984(!) by Abdel-Hamid:

The results come from the modeling of a generic project including interactions with the “outside” e.g. management – based on interviews and a case-study:

  1. Different schedules create a different project. i.e. you cannot decide, if one method is more accurate.
  2. The optimal QA expenditure level is 16% of development days
  3. Brooks’ Law is not universal: adding more persons makes a project more costly, but not necessarily to complete later

Summary of a fruitful LinkedIn discussion

Ref: How Does It Help?

Jay: From a systems thinking perspective, the entire project can be viewed as an integrated “system,” where each of the aspects/elements identified in the framework is a component of the overall system.

Jay:  Linking the simulation activities/effort to the actual project management activities can potentially overburden the PM process with tasks and activities that are not in keeping with the need to manage the project.

T.A.: As project managers begin to think about the goals of the project, they should also think about how the finished product meets customer needs, how it satisfies corporate goals, how it compares to competitive products, and it might be managed so that it motivates co-workers.

Mirko: Good project managers (PM) will intuitively “model” the project as a system while thinking about the plan/risks etc. With System Thinking the PM scope is extended to the “outside” and the “how”.

Jonathan: Projects often coexist with other projects. They may even compete with them for resources. Would it not be beneficial to understand the dynamic that determines how those resources are applied?

Duane: “Setting up” a project is not a PM task. That is more the realm of a business analyst or product manager, with the guidance of an architect. A project manager is typically not even assigned until the project has already been “set up” and approved.

Jay: According to PMI’s structured approach to conducting a project, there are five stages: Initiation, Planning, Execution, Monitoring and Controlling, and Closing. It’s actually in the first stage when a project begins to take shape against the requirements/needs of the business. And it’s at that very beginning point where a Project Manager needs to be present and fully participative… even before a project team is selected. In the context of best practices, the PM would play a key role (working together with a project sponsor and key subject matter experts) in helping to build the case-for-action (aka project justification or business case).

Mirko: In a “traditional” (PMI) setup the PM will lead all roles and takes over the customer/line communication. In alternative setups, e.g. Scrum, these responsibilities may be split between product owner and scrum master.

Duane: I’m a proponent of the focus of ST at the enterprise level (and pre-project level) rather than the project level.

Related articles

System Dynamics in Project Management